Without Writing

The art of writing without writing… about fighting.

Tag Archives: wrestling

The Perniciousness of Mimicry

This is not a bee.

In an old blog entry on the subject of Steven “Runs Like a Girl” Seagal, the martial teacher and commentator Steve Morris noted that the secret to the success of liars like Seagal is that they are able to convince people of their ability, despite the fact that they lack ability. He stated:

“their greatest talent does not lie in what they get paid for doing, but in their ability to get people to believe that what they do is for real and what they say is true.”

This is the art of the mimic. In nature, a mimic is something which has- through the process of natural selection- evolved over countless generations an uncanny similarity to another thing, be that thing an inanimate object, a part of a plant, or another animal. This similarity offers protection from predators… Or disguises the mimic’s dangerousness, depending on the type of camouflage employed. Read more of this post

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Nationalism Through the Lens of a Martial Art

In April of this year, there was a minor kerfuffle in the UK regarding some ringers from Eastern Europe being brought in to supplement the British wrestling team, in time for the 2012 olympic games.

It’s only a matter of time before this man is competing for the UK in the olympics.

The fact that people born and raised in one nation can compete in international amateur sports for a completely different nation if granted citizenship in their new country is a new one on me. I had some vague idea that one had to be a 2nd generation national in order to compete for a country at the olympics… clearly this was mere fantasy on my part.

My immediate reaction was surprise and a kind of vague irritation, especially when I read how disappointed the native British wrestlers were that their place on the national olympic squad had been taken by someone from the Ukraine…

But then I caught myself, and gave myself a ceremonial punch in the face as punishment. Read more of this post

The pros and cons of MMA

Often I rant about the superiority of MMA training when compared to esoteric and exotic pseudo-martial arts such as Karate, Aikido, Systema etc. This is becoming a more common thing to say than it used to be, when only the lonely figures of men like Bruce Lee, Steve Morris and later Geoff Thompson were shouting in the wilderness.

These days, websites like Bullshido have made it their stock-in-trade to advocate for all fighting arts other than those used by the current crop of MMA fighters, (e.g: muay thai, brazillian jujutsu and amateur wrestling) to be summarily abolished. A tiresome attitude in my view, but more intellectually defensible than the attitudes of many pseudo-martial artists who fetishize a kind of hippy-esque one-world inclusiveness, and value it over practicality. Read more of this post

Positive Thinking in Skill Acquisition and in Life

Recently, I wrote a two-part guest article for the blog of a friend of mine, who- to protect the innocent- shall remain nameless except for his nom de plume: Man in a Bottle.

Here is a link to said article:

Part 1.

Part 2.

I urge any readers to visit the blog in question, it’s a fascinating read.

Where to begin?

Following neatly on from my previous post, this will (partially) address the (complex) question of how to begin one’s training in the martial arts.

My idea of the best way to begin studying the martial arts is in many ways based on the deficiencies in my own start. As stated in my initial blog posts, I spent (or sadly, mis-spent) much of my precious youth in the meaningless and wasteful practice of Japanese and Chinese martial arts styles that did not have any application to real-world combat. Following these ignominious beginnings, I began to move towards the practice of reality-based training. Read more of this post