Without Writing

The art of writing without writing… about fighting.

Tag Archives: commando

How To Spot a Fraud

While discussing my blog post on Sid Sofos (and people like him) with some friends, the following question came up: Is there a hard and fast way of spotting those in the field of martial arts who wish to pull the wool over your eyes by giving you ineffective techniques, and taking your money in the process?

It’s true that Sofos is a painfully obvious example of a completely fake, totally meritless excuse for a martial arts instructor. But people still seem to have been taken in by him, especially those without previous martial arts experience. So how can prospective martial artists possibly protect themselves from frauds who are more convincing than Sofos? And let’s face it, any fraud will be more convincing than Sofos. Read more of this post

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Death-touch of the Ninja Shinobi Commando!

Every so often in life, even the lay person will encounter… A Ninja!

Let me start this article by making two things very clear:

– There are no such things asĀ  Ninja.
– I have met people who CALL what they do “Ninjutsu“, and who presumably think of themselves AS Ninja (at least nominally); whose martial arts skills are good enough to break the average person in half… But that doesn’t make them Ninja.

A little history might be useful at this point.

In old Japan (from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries) there MAY have been organised clans of mercenaries specialising in assassination and espionage, who were called “Shinobi”, which translates to “One who escapes stealthily”. Read more of this post

Alternative Career Paths for Martial Artists

It has become something of a tradition in certain martial arts circles to dabble in specific professions once one has been training for a certain length of time. These career choices are rarely healthy, however, and are rarely true to the spirit of the martial arts as I understand it.

When I was training in my late teenage years, the school I was attending at the time had a small group of black-belts. Most of these men worked as bouncers, and up-and-coming students were encouraged to consider this as a career move, and as a part of their training. The emphasis was on “testing one’s skills” in a live environment. Read more of this post